Teaching In High Scool

Setting the Standard to Prepare Students for Life

High school is the time period where students will formulate opinions, habits and make choices that will significantly impact their adult lives. This is where high school teachers come into the equation; to help guide these students on a positive educational path that help them navigate the real world after graduation. Take a look at what it takes to teach all of the major courses taught in high school to decide how you’d like to advance your teaching career.

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High school lecturers instruct students from grades 9 to 12. Well into their teenage years, these students are older and more mature, with a developing sense of independence. High school students also have lives approaching the frenzy and complexity of adulthood, often balancing academics and increased responsibilities at home with athletics, social relationships—including romantic ones—and a job.
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Biology, also known as life science, is a branch of the natural sciences concerned with the study of living organisms. Biology is a vast and eclectic field of study with a myriad of subfields ranging from zoology to microbiology. For this reason, while some biologists work primarily in laboratory settings, others spend extended periods of time in the field observing living organisms in their natural habitat and still others work in hospitals and medical research centers. As an interdisciplinary field with many branches, there are also a myriad of contexts in which one can teach biology and a need for biology teachers at all levels of the school system.
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Becoming an art teacher is a somewhat unique endeavor that may or may not overlap with other paths to becoming a teacher, depending on the level at which you wish to teach. While elementary, middle and high school teachers are typically certified teachers who enjoy working with students in a creative setting, at the college and university levels, a higher percentage of art teachers are practicing artists who supplement their incomes by teaching. For this reason, at least at the postsecondary level, one’s reputation as an artist may be as important as one’s educational background.
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Economists are concerned with more than money. They explore questions related to labor, land, investments, income, production, taxes and government expenditures. In short, they are concerned with how people use resources, human or natural, and with the implications of these uses. As a result, despite the fact that economics is often associated with mathematics, it is a highly interdisciplinary field that overlaps with fields as diverse as history, law, health, education, political science and environmental studies.
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Anyone who completes their formative education in the US is required to study English and with few exceptions, they are required to take one or more English courses per year from Grade 1 through to first-year college. For this reason, most Americans have contact with many English teachers. If they are often the teachers we remember best, even years after graduation, however, it may also be due to the fact that English or ELA (English Language Arts) courses are typically offered five days per week. This means that English teachers in middle schools and high schools often serve double duty as homeroom teachers.
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Business education is a longstanding tradition in American schools. As early as the 18th century, schools were offering bookkeeping courses, and throughout the 20th century, shorthand and typing were core subjects of the high school curriculum.
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From plastics to soft drinks, chemists are responsible for the development of thousands of modern products that are taken for granted everyday. Indeed, the products chemists help to develop are ubiquitous, and as a result, teaching chemistry is teaching about life itself. In short, chemistry is integral to explaining the world in which we live.
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In 2013, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that there are close to 1 million high school teachers in America. A career as a high school teacher has long been a popular vocation for women and men, and in many respects, this is no surprise. After all, an individual can become a high school teacher with five to six years of postsecondary education, they are generally respected members of the community, and they typically enjoy a higher level of autonomy than teachers working in lower grades of the school system.
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Like English and mathematics, history is a core subject in nearly all elementary, middle, and high schools. At the elementary and middle school levels, history is typically taught under the more general heading of social studies. At the high school, college, and university levels, history is a separate discipline.
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People who love mathematics and thrive in its formal study, have many opportunities in today’s job market. From engineering to finance, there are plenty of career prospects for people with a strong aptitude for mathematics. This means that finding outstanding mathematics teachers can be a challenge. In contrast to people who hold degrees in the arts or humanities, people who hold degrees in mathematics, and its related applied fields can choose to pursue lucrative forms of employment in industry and finance.
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For many years, educators have recognized the value of physical education. In Plato’s Republic, readers are given detailed instructions on what a physical education should entail, and why it is important. Indeed, today’s “gym,” which is the place where physical education typically takes place, comes from the ancient concept of gymnasium, which was used to describe a gymnastics school or place of physical training. While it may be difficult to imagine Plato as a physical education teacher, there is no question that physical education, alongside philosophy, is one of the world’s oldest disciplines.
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By definition, a substitute teacher is someone who fills in for a regular teacher when the teacher is sick, on leave, or engaging in a professional development activity. While substitute teachers frequently only spend a day or two in a classroom before moving on to a new classroom or a new school, in the case of parental leaves, they may take over a class for six to eight weeks, or longer.
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In other words, teaching English to non-native speakers requires a high level of proficiency in English, a superior understanding of English-language grammar, and the ability to explain the language’s many and often perplexing rules. For those up to the challenge, however, there are many job prospects in the U.S. and abroad.
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Physics is a scientific discipline concerned with the investigation of the nature and property of matter and energy. Over the past two thousand years, physics has been used to investigate phenomena ranging from light and sound to the universe itself. Too complex for the elementary or middle school levels, physics typically only begins to be formally offered at the high school level.
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In the US, foreign language teachers typically offer courses in Spanish, French, German, Chinese, Japanese or Russian. In some areas of the US, however, there are such a high number of native Spanish speaking students that Spanish is not treated as a foreign language
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There are many career paths for people interested in teaching music. First, there are opportunities for skilled musicians to teach music privately and at private music schools. In most cases, these positions look for skilled musicians with some teaching experience but do not necessarily require any formal academic or teaching credentials.
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