University Professors

Creating Future Leaders at The University Level

Today’s job market is extremely competitive. In fact, many entry level jobs that up until 20 years ago simply required a high school diploma, now require a degree from a major college or university. Today’s university professor must possess exceptional educational and interpersonal skills to pass on education and learning to a generation that is quickly evolving. The path for becoming a university professor can be complex, but you’ll get expert tips and career advice from individuals that have navigated this career choice – and done so successfully.

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While teachers at all levels of the school system explore subjects that are informed by the insights of anthropologists, there is few anthropology courses offered prior to the college level. In some school districts, anthropology is offered in high schools as a senior-level elective, but there’s no clear pathway to becoming an anthropology teacher in this context.
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Biology, also known as life science, is a branch of the natural sciences concerned with the study of living organisms. Biology is a vast and eclectic field of study with a myriad of subfields ranging from zoology to microbiology. For this reason, while some biologists work primarily in laboratory settings, others spend extended periods of time in the field observing living organisms in their natural habitat and still others work in hospitals and medical research centers. As an interdisciplinary field with many branches, there are also a myriad of contexts in which one can teach biology and a need for biology teachers at all levels of the school system.
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Astronomy is the formal study of the sun, moon, stars, planets, comets, galaxies, gas, dust and other non-Earthly phenomena. In other words, astronomy is a field of study focused on the universe. In ancient times, astronomy overlapped with astrology and included formal investigations of celestial phenomena of all kinds.
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Economists are concerned with more than money. They explore questions related to labor, land, investments, income, production, taxes and government expenditures. In short, they are concerned with how people use resources, human or natural, and with the implications of these uses. As a result, despite the fact that economics is often associated with mathematics, it is a highly interdisciplinary field that overlaps with fields as diverse as history, law, health, education, political science and environmental studies.
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While it is often said that people who cannot do, teach, most teachers disagree. After all, teaching is a science and an art. With the exception of college and university teachers who typically start teaching with no training at all, the vast majority of teachers have spent one to two years training to become teachers prior to being hired. So who teaches teachers?
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In recent years, engineering, once primarily taught at the postsecondary level, has become integrated into the elementary, middle school and high school curriculums. The growing focus on engineering education is part of a larger push to promote STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects from an early age.
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Anyone who completes their formative education in the US is required to study English and with few exceptions, they are required to take one or more English courses per year from Grade 1 through to first-year college. For this reason, most Americans have contact with many English teachers. If they are often the teachers we remember best, even years after graduation, however, it may also be due to the fact that English or ELA (English Language Arts) courses are typically offered five days per week. This means that English teachers in middle schools and high schools often serve double duty as homeroom teachers.
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Environmental studies and science are relatively new academic disciplines, which have both grown in popularity over the past three decades with the rise of the environmental movement. Environmental studies and environmental science overlap, but they are marked by some important differences. Most notably, environmental studies is concerned with environmental problems, their social impacts and the political stakes in current environmental debates. Environmental science applies scientific methods from disciplines such as biology, geology and chemistry to the study of the environment and current environmental problems.
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Business education is a longstanding tradition in American schools. As early as the 18th century, schools were offering bookkeeping courses, and throughout the 20th century, shorthand and typing were core subjects of the high school curriculum.
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From plastics to soft drinks, chemists are responsible for the development of thousands of modern products that are taken for granted everyday. Indeed, the products chemists help to develop are ubiquitous, and as a result, teaching chemistry is teaching about life itself. In short, chemistry is integral to explaining the world in which we live.
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Child development is a field of study concerned with the growth and well being of children and young adults. Child development studies programs take many forms, and in some cases, child development is taught under other names, such as family studies, or offered as a concentration within education, social work, or psychology programs. Depending on whether an individual is teaching child development at the college or university level, qualifications to become a child development teacher range from a bachelor’s degree and relevant work experience, to a PhD in child development studies or a related discipline.
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Mention professor and an eccentric, but dignified figure lecturing to students in a cavernous classroom on an ivy-covered campus is likely what comes to mind. While these people and institutions do exist, in reality, teaching at the college or university level takes many forms. Depending on the type of college or university a professor works for, and his or her area of expertise, expectations, working conditions, and compensation can vary so greatly that placing all postsecondary teaching positions in the same category may even be misleading.
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Computers are ubiquitous, yet today most children learn how to interact with icons and apps even before they learn how to read. However, using computers and understanding how they operate are two different things, and this is the focus of computer science.
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Criminal justice studies programs introduce students to topics concerned with the law, justice system, policing, security, crime and corrections. Criminal justice studies, also known as criminology, often overlaps with other social science disciplines, including political science, sociology and legal studies. In this sense, it may be best understood as an applied social science discipline, and for this reason, like other applied social sciences it has both a theoretical and practical side.
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Film teachers, like art teachers, may fill one of two different positions. First, there are people who teach film or cinema studies. These are people who teach you how to become the next Siskel or Ebert, or a future contributor to a scholarly journal like Cinema Journal.
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Health Science is an umbrella term for many different health-related disciplines. Depending on whether you are teaching health sciences at the secondary or postsecondary level, it can mean two very different things. At the high school level, health science teachers sometimes focus on teaching healthy lifestyles to students, such as units on drug prevention or nutrition. However, some states also offer health science courses that aim to prepare students for careers in health science fields.
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Like English and mathematics, history is a core subject in nearly all elementary, middle, and high schools. At the elementary and middle school levels, history is typically taught under the more general heading of social studies. At the high school, college, and university levels, history is a separate discipline.
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People who love mathematics and thrive in its formal study, have many opportunities in today’s job market. From engineering to finance, there are plenty of career prospects for people with a strong aptitude for mathematics. This means that finding outstanding mathematics teachers can be a challenge. In contrast to people who hold degrees in the arts or humanities, people who hold degrees in mathematics, and its related applied fields can choose to pursue lucrative forms of employment in industry and finance.
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In contrast to most teaching positions, the demand for nursing teachers, commonly known as nurse educators, is higher than average. Indeed, there is currently a shortage of qualified nurse educators across the US. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) cites two reasons for the current shortage, including, a limited pool of prepared nurses, and non-competitive salaries notably, most highly qualified and experienced nurses make more working in a clinical setting than they do as a professor of nursing.
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For many decades, schools employed teachers who were nearly always women to offer courses in home economics. While the concept of home economics is now dated, in the early 20th century, home economics served as a pathway into higher education for many women.
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For many years, educators have recognized the value of physical education. In Plato’s Republic, readers are given detailed instructions on what a physical education should entail, and why it is important. Indeed, today’s “gym,” which is the place where physical education typically takes place, comes from the ancient concept of gymnasium, which was used to describe a gymnastics school or place of physical training. While it may be difficult to imagine Plato as a physical education teacher, there is no question that physical education, alongside philosophy, is one of the world’s oldest disciplines.
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At many colleges and universities, Introduction to Psychology is the most popular course on campus. At larger universities, these courses are often simply known as “Psych 101,” and are held in lecture halls where 1000’s of students gather to learn about topics ranging from, Pavlov’s dogs and classical conditioning theories, to Freud’s eccentric case studies and perspectives on the Oedipus complex.
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The primary function of school speech-language pathologists is to work with students either one-on-one or individually to help improve their communication skills through interventions and exercises. School speech-language pathologists are also expected to regularly communicate students’ progress to parents and classroom teachers.
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When people talk about the social sciences, they are typically referring to many disciplines, rather than a single discipline. For this reason, most social science teachers are experts in a more narrowly defined field, but there are some exceptions, especially at the elementary and middle school levels.
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While they do provide counseling, social workers also play a critical role in connecting clients to services. For example, they might help a client get their name on a waiting list for subsidized housing, or enroll in a free English-language course.
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Physics is a scientific discipline concerned with the investigation of the nature and property of matter and energy. Over the past two thousand years, physics has been used to investigate phenomena ranging from light and sound to the universe itself. Too complex for the elementary or middle school levels, physics typically only begins to be formally offered at the high school level.
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In the US, foreign language teachers typically offer courses in Spanish, French, German, Chinese, Japanese or Russian. In some areas of the US, however, there are such a high number of native Spanish speaking students that Spanish is not treated as a foreign language
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There are many career paths for people interested in teaching music. First, there are opportunities for skilled musicians to teach music privately and at private music schools. In most cases, these positions look for skilled musicians with some teaching experience but do not necessarily require any formal academic or teaching credentials.
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Teaching philosophy is an ancient art. The Socratic Method, an approach to teaching that pivots around teachers asking thought-provoking questions that lead students to explore a concept until they discover its limits, is one of the better-known examples of the place where philosophy and teaching intersect. Of course, Socrates was notoriously adverse to the written word.
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Teaching assistants work in public and private schools under the supervision of certified teachers. At the college and university levels, they work under the supervision of professors. Teaching assistants typically assist with the supervision of students, especially in small group settings, and with grading, among other assigned duties.
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