Becoming a Teacher in Vermont

Explore Program, Licensing and Job Outlook Data for 2016

Guide to Becoming a Teacher in Vermont

If you’re hoping to become a teacher in Vermont, ToBecomeATeacher.org is here to help. This page describes the key steps you’ll need to take to be a licensed Vermont teacher and obtain a teaching position that meets your professional expectations.

1. Choosing a Program: The first step is to find a teaching program that is right for you.

  • Finding an appropriate program that fits your needs is a critical first step. To ensure you select a program that meets your needs, it is important to ask the right questions. What is important to you as a student? Are you concerned about the cost of the program or the amount of debt you might incur? Does the program’s graduation rate matter? Are you concerned about the program’s history of job placement? Is there a specific specialization you hope to pursue and does the program offer this specialization?

2. Planning for Licensure in Vermont: In Vermont, you will need a minimum of a bachelor degree and an appropriate post-graduate degree in education. You will also need to write and pass applicable teacher certification exams.

3. Entering the Workforce: Once you’ve completed your education and passed the applicable exams, you can launch your teaching career in Vermont.

  • At this point, it is important to consider the type of teaching environment in which you hope to work? Are you interested in working in a town, small city or rural community? What are your lifestyle priorities? What are your salary expectations? During this stage of the process, you should also keep developing your resume, expanding your education by engaging in professional development activities and gaining additional teaching experience (e.g., by working as a substitute teacher). This will help you to enter the market with a competitive edge.

Choosing an Education Program in Vermont

ToBecomeATeacher.org understands that choosing the right program can a difficult process. With the aid of a complex algorithmic tool, we have reviewed, tested and documented top education programs across the state. Using 2015 data, our team of researchres has analyzed total expense, student-to-faculty ratios, graduation rates, potential earnings, return on investment and much more.

Every school ToBecomeATeacher.org lists below has committed themselves to the pursuit of excellence and shown exemplary dedication to education of the highest caliber. These programs are Vermont’s very best. Find out which ones stand above the rest and best match your own priorities by reviewing the information posted below.

Castleton State College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 13 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 41144
  • Acceptance rate 92.05 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 46.23 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 25596

Johnson State College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 13 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 41144
  • Acceptance rate 96.88 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 34.95 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 26268

College of St Joseph

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 10 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 84800
  • Acceptance rate 68.31 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 40.54 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 23863

University of Vermont

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 15 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 62872
  • Acceptance rate 77.55 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 75.82 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 21893.5

Goddard College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 8 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 59720
  • Acceptance rate 100 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 27.78 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 19750

Lyndon State College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 14 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 41144
  • Acceptance rate 99.34 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 33.15 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 26900

Champlain College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 14 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 125400
  • Acceptance rate 70.79 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 61.98 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 27000

Norwich University

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 14 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 133484
  • Acceptance rate 63.49 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 55.15 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 27000

Saint Michael's College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 12 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 156060
  • Acceptance rate 75.11 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 78.37 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 27000

Bennington College

  • Student to Faculty Ratio 8 :1
  • Total expected expense for a bachelors degree$ 180320
  • Acceptance rate 64.87 %
  • Average state starting salary$ 35541
  • Graduation Rate 65.86 %
  • Median Graduate Debt incurred$ 26900
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Ranking Factors Explained

Our ranking data is based upon Collegescorecard.gov, IPEDS, and the Carnegie Foundation data sets.

 

How to Become a Teacher In Vermont

The National Education Association has released its most recent state-by-state comparison of pubic education. With all of the positive areas that Vermont enjoys in the field of education, there are some concerns. One of these concerns is that standards in the state for testing and graduation are too low. For example, in 2011 only 21.5 percent of 11th graders passed all subjects of the New England Common Assessment Program – a test that measures student’s reading, writing, math, and science skills. There are also concerns that students aren’t continuing to college, or graduating from college at appropriate rates.

Becoming Licensed to Teach in Vermont

To teach in a public or private school in Vermont, you must hold a state issued Professional Educator’s License.  Teachers in Vermont will begin their licensing procedures by applying for their Professional Educator’s License, which is valid for three years. These teachers may apply for Level II Professional Educator’s License, renewable every 7 years after they have three years of teaching experience under the Level One standard. They must also submit a professional development plan, and completed 3 credits of coursework post-Bachelor’s degree.

For teachers with three or more years of teaching experience, and licensed teachers trained out of state with three or more years of experience can apply for a Standard Professional 2 (SP2) Professional Educator’s License that is available to teachers in Vermont.

What resources do teachers have to help them during their careers in Vermont?

Teachers who are looking for employment in the state of Vermont can start at the Vermont Agency of Education Employment Opportunities page. The page provides information on all levels of educational employment, standards, and for both public and private schools in the state. The Agency of Education also provides links to popular resources for teachers who want information on professional development including networks, standards, materials and regional events.

The website Eduplace.com has a list of links to professional organizations and course materials, museums, government websites with teaching materials, historical documents and much more. Teachers can find a great deal of information for themselves and their classrooms by following the links provided on the Eduplace webpage for the state.

Many teachers decide to join professional organizations to help their network and careers. Depending on the subject and grade level of students, some of the most popular teacher organizations, include: The Vermont Council on Reading, the Vermont Science Teachers Association, Vermont Alliance for the Social Studies, and the Vermont Alliance for Arts Education.

What is the job outlook for teaching careers in the state of Vermont?

There are four teaching subject areas that are experiencing teacher shortages through the entire state: Spanish, Health Education, English and Special Education. There are also shortages for librarians and principals in all counties. Some counties need to fill positions in ESL, Mathematics, French, and Music in addition to the above. The state has embraced student loan forgiveness, grants for education, and special loan programs to help fill these spots and attract teachers to the state.

The mean annual wage for teachers in Vermont varies by state, and grade level being taught. The Vermont Agency of Education publishes a yearly report on salaries across the state. The average annual salary in the state for teachers works out to around $50,000, although it depends largely on experience, grade level, and school.

What online programs are available to potential teachers in the state of Vermont?

The University of Vermont offers a Distance Education program that includes Educational Technology, Communication Science and Disorders, School Library Media and many more classes. Courses are asynchronous, meaning students do not have a specific day or time they need to be present in a class. Rather, assignments and interactions can be submitted throughout the week to keep up with course requirements.

The Community College of Vermont has many online courses for their education programs that can be taken online. Interested students can search by subject to find which courses are offered online. Credits for online courses range between one and three, depending on the focus. For example, students can gain credit for developing their teaching portfolio, or can take classes like Fostering Creative Learning for Children.

Conclusion

Teachers who desire to work in Vermont will find well-established teacher programs, promising districts, and lots of resources and support. The state ranks highly in a number of educational areas and has many opportunities for professional development that can be applied to career advancement or opportunities out of state. The many colleges and universities in the state have a variety of approaches to educator training. This allows aspiring teachers to find a program that fits their aspirations as well as teaching style and the school subject of their choice.

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