Top Areas for Hiring

From Charlotte to High Point, North Carolina offers opportunities for educators statewide but in some locations, educators can expect to make more money and see their take home pay go further. Explore the state’s top destinations.

  • Population
  • Cost of Living Index
  • Average Pay
  • Weekly Hiring Trends
  • Types of Hiring
1Charlotte
  • 827, 097
  • 95.4%
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $45,123
  • [TBA]

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools is the largest employer of public school teachers in the region. Instructions for educators seeking employment can be found on the school district’s job opportunities page. Queens University of Charlotte and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte are the primary employers on the postsecondary side. Another option is the Art Institute of Charlotte. Teaching salaries for public school teachers in the region generally fall significantly below the region’s living wage estimate for a family of four.

2Raleigh
  • 451,066
  • 91.3%
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $46,660
  • [TBA]

The Wake County Public School System is among the largest employers on the K-12 side of hiring. Educators seeking work can find current job announcements on the district’s human resources page. On the postsecondary side, North Carolina State University and Wake Technical Community College are the best bets. The city is also home to many private, mostly faith-based, colleges. Average public school teaching salaries in Raleigh generally lag behind the region’s living wage estimates, but dual-income educator families are generally able to meet or exceed their needs.

3Greensboro
  • 285,342
  • n/a
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $44,810
  • [TBA]

In Greensboro, the best bet on the K-12 side of hiring is Guilford County Schools. Educators seeking employment can find jobs on the facilitator’s employment page. For teachers at the postsecondary level, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro is the primary employer of full-time faculty. See their recruitment site for details. College educators can also look for work at several local colleges. Public school teachers living and working in Greensboro generally earn below the city’s wage estimate, although educator families with a dual income typically meet or exceed the city’s living wage requirements.

4Durham
  • 300,952
  • 88.5%
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $45,396
  • [TBA]

Durham Public Schools is the city’s largest employer of public school teachers. Educators looking for employment can find jobs on the school district’s employment page. For postsecondary educators living in Durham, Duke University is the best bet, but a top-ranked institution that recruits the very best educators and researchers from around the world. For openings, see their employment page. Local colleges include Durham Technical Community College. Teaching salaries in Durham fall significantly below the city’s estimated living wage for a family of four. The exception is full-time educators at Duke University; they tend to make well above the region’s living wage and enjoy a very comfortable life in Durham.

5Winston-Salem
  • 241,218
  • 93.4%
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $43,103
  • [TBA]

Forsyth County Schools Public Schools employs a large number of teachers in its 81 schools from the elementary to high school level. Educators seeking work can find anticipated job openings on the school district’s employment opportunities page. Winston Salem State University is the largest employer of postsecondary educators in Winston Salem with over 300 teaching staff. Open faculty positions can be found through the university’s employment page. On the college side of hiring, Forsyth Technical Community College in the best bet. Like other regions of the state, educators generally make well under the living wage requirements for a family of four.

6Fayetteville
  • 201,963
  • n/a
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $53,546
  • [TBA]

Cumberland County Schools operates 88 schools and is Fayetteville’s largest employer of educators. Educators looking for employment can find job postings on the school district’s employment page. At the postsecondary level Fayetteville State University employs 255 full-time faculty and available job opportunities are posted on the institute’s employment opportunities page. For college teaching jobs, see Fayetteville Technical Community College is the best best. Teaching salaries in Fayetteville fall short of the city’s living wage index but dual-income educator families generally meet and exceed the city’s living wage estimate.

7Cary
  • 159,769
  • n/a
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers
  • $43,586
  • [TBA]

The primary employer of public school teachers in the region is Wake County Public Schools. Educators looking for work in the district can find upcoming employment opportunities listed on their employment page. There are no major colleges or universities in Cary. Like other cities in the state, regional data suggests that teaching salaries in Cary fall below the region’s estimated living wage needs to support to a family of four.

8Wilmington
  • 115,933
  • 97.0%
  • Elementary, Middle School and High School Teachers, College and University Professors
  • $40,950
  • [TBA]

New Hanover County Schools is the main employer of classroom teachers in Wilmington; teachers seeking employment in the city can find jobs listed on the school district’s employment page. The University of North Carolina at Wilmington is the primary employer of postsecondary educators in Wilmington with 630 teachers working full time. Opportunities for employment can be found on the university’s career page. On the college side of hiring, the best bet is Cape Fear Community College. Teachers working full-time in the city should expect their annual salaries to fall substantially below the city’s annual living wage index.

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